ENGL 12500:  GREAT WORKS OF LITERATURE:IM:  4 Hour(s)  

GREAT WORKS OF LITERATURE:IM~ This course will explore a group of well-known works of literature organized around the idea of Utopia. We will explore origins of utopianism, how it has changed and been criticized over time, and its relevance to us today. Considered a reading course, the class will emphasize recall, analysis, and understanding of literature. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement.

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 14000:  SURVEY IN DRAMATIC LIT:IM:  3 Hour(s)  

SURVEY IN DRAMATIC LITERATURE:IM~ This course provides an introduction to the variety, complexity, and originality of works written for stage presentation. The students study different styles of dramatic literature through individual plays chosen to represent diverse time periods and literary styles. The course concentrates on developing the student's critical capabilities through short responsive papers on sensitivity to historical and stylistic influences and on general techniques for reading plays. By considering serious and comic plays, both ancient and contemporary, the course offers a student an overview of the contributions drama has made to the fine arts throughout history. Also offered as Theater 14000. A student may receive credit for only one of these courses. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement.

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 18000:  WKSP::  1 Hour(s)  

WORKSHOP~ This workshop will provide the opportunity for students to examine a special topic in English. Through readings, discussions and written assignments there will be opportunities to evaluate the topic at issue. Workshops may be taken Pass/No Credit only. Students may take no more than nine workshops for credit toward graduation. Workshops can be used as elective credit only. (For PGS students only.)

ENGL 20000:  HISTORY OF WESTERN THEA I:IM:  3 Hour(s)  

HISTORY OF WESTERN THEATRE I:IM~ This course surveys the development of the Western theatre from its origins through the Renaissance and introduces the theatre of the Orient. Along with select plays, the student will study acting styles, actors, theatre architecture, costuming, and scene design. Also offered as THEA 20000. A student may receive credit for only one of these courses. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement. Previously offered as THEA/ENGL (251/25100).

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 20100:  HISTORY OF WESTERN THEA II:IM:  3 Hour(s)  

HISTORY OF WESTERN THEATRE II:IM~ Beginning in 1660 England, this course studies plays, playwrights, acting styles, actors, theatre architecture, costuming, scene design, and the development of the role of the director in the U.S. and Europe up through the present. This course will also cover a survey of Third World Theatre. Also listed as Theater 20100. A student may receive credit for only one of these courses. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement. Previously ENGL 252/25200

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 20600:  INTRO TO LITERARY STUDIES:IM:  4 Hour(s)  

INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES:IM~ A basic introduction to the study of literature, with an emphasis on British and American examples. Through discussion and writing, students study the major genres in Western Literature, practice textual analysis, and are introduced to significant theories of literary criticism. Several critical papers and one documented research paper are required. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement.

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 20900:  SHAKESPEARE IN PERFORMANCE:CM:  3 Hour(s)  

SHAKESPEARE IN PERFORMANCE:CM~ Performance is the way in which dramatic texts come to life, and performing a play is an indispensable heuristic to knowledge about it. In this course, advanced students of Shakespeare shall investigate one play in its entirety, learning each scene by staging it. Becoming familiar with the work of the actor and director as well as with that of the critic, scholar, and reviewer, students will keep a daily journal and write analyses of scenes in preparation for staging work in class. The instructor will not serve as a director; rather, students will explore scenes in their own groups. Readings will include critical essays, scholarly discussions of textual issues, and reviews of performances. Also listed as THEA 20900. This course fulfills the Creative Methods requirement.

Core: Creative Methods

ENGL 21900:  READ AM LIT:IM,UD:  1-4 Hour(s)  

READINGS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE:IM,UD~ This course will present some of the masterpieces, both major and minor, of American literature. The course may be organized around a major theme (such as "Nature in American Literature"), may concentrate on important works of a single author ("The Poetry of Emily Dickinson" or "Hemingway's Novels"), or may examine examples of a particular literary genre ("The American Short Story," "Journals and Diaries in American Life"). Recent offerings include: "American Renaissance," "Harlem Renaissance," and "Ohio and the Western Reserve." Suitable for major and non-majors. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Understanding Diversity at Home requirement.

Core: Interpretive Methods; Understanding Diversity Home

ENGL 22200:  READ BRIT LIT:CA, IM:  1-4 Hour(s)  

READINGS IN BRITISH LITERATURE:CA, IM~ This course will present some of the masterpieces, both major and minor, of British literature. The course may be organized around a theme (such as "Depictions of Class in British Literature"), may concentrate on important works of a single author ("Jane Austen's Contribution to the Novel"), or may examine examples of a particular literary genre ("Modern British Poetry" or "The Development of the English Mystery"). Recent offerings include: "Charles Dickens," "English Renaissance Poetry," and "Utopias and Dystopias." Fills both Cultural Analysis and Interpretive Methods Not recommended for English majors.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 22600:  READ WORLD LIT:IM,EW:  1-4 Hour(s)  

READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE:IM,EW~ This course will present some of the masterpieces, both major and minor, of world literature. The course may be arranged around a theme (such as "Post-colonialism" or "The Epic Impulse" ), may concentrate on important works of a single author or geographical area ("The Novels of West Africa," "Nabokov's Russian and American Novels"), or may examine examples of a specific genre of writing (such as "African and Australian plays" or "English Poetry in Asia"). Recent offerings include: "20th-Century Indian Literature" and "Postcolonial Literature." Not recommended for English majors. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Exploring the World requirement.

Core: Experiencing the World; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 23500:  CONTEMPORARY POETRY:  4 Hour(s)  

CONTEMPORARY POETRY~ English language poetry during the last years of the 20th century and the early 21st century has become turbulent with competing styles and personalities. This course will focus upon four or five distinctive poets of the present day, including newcomers as well as established writers.

ENGL 24100:  LIT PERSPECTIVE ON WOMEN:IM,CA:  3 Hour(s)  

LITERARY PERSPECTIVES ON WOMEN:IM,CA~ Gender expectations have shaped women's roles in literature and their work as writers. This course examines several facets of the complex dilemmas faced by women artists within their historical context. Its perspectives include such concerns as the debate about women's innate nature, their role in both the domestic and outside world, their contributions, and their current status within literary culture. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement. Counts toward the Gender Studies Minor.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 25200:  ENGLISH LANG:LINGUISTIC INTRO:  3 Hour(s)  

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE: A LINGUISTIC INTRODUCTION ~ This course traces the historical development of the English language from its Indo-European origins down to present day U.S. speech, with a special emphasis on the various contemporary American dialects. In studying this long evolution of our native tongue, students will be introduced to modern linguistic techniques and terminology. Some fieldwork in local dialects will be required. A revised version of this course is offered for four (4) credit hours as English (254 or 25400). A student may receive credit for only one of these courses. Also listed as Communication (252 or 25200).

ENGL 25300:  LANGUAGE IN THE USA:UD:  3 Hour(s)  

LANGUAGE IN THE USA:UD ~ We will engage in sustained discussion of the language situation in the United States of America, informed by a representative sample of relevant published work. While paying due attention to the extensive role of varieties of English, we will strive to provide an adequate account of the linguistic and cultural diversity of the nation, and the extent to which speakers of other languages are maintaining their mother tongues or shifting to English. Implications of the subject matter for public and educational policy will be infused throughout the discussion.

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

ENGL 25400:  ENGLISH LANG LINGUISTIC INTRO:  4 Hour(s)  

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE: A LINGUISTIC INTRODUCTION ~ This course traces the historical development of the English language from its Indo-European origins down to present day U.S. speech, with a special emphasis on the various contemporary American dialects. In studying this long evolution of our native tongue, students will be introduced to modern linguistic techniques and terminology. Some fieldwork in local dialects will be required. A revised version of this course is offered for three (3) credit hours as English (252 or 25200). A student may receive credit for only one of these courses.

ENGL 25500:  HOW WE TALK:DIALECTOLOGY:MM:  3 Hour(s)  

DIALECTOLOGY:MM~ This course explores the elements of North American dialects, defining them and discussing issues surrounding dialect, such as media stereotypes and cultural perceptions of dialects. Students study the history, syntax, lexicon, and (especially) the phonology of the major American dialects, then produce a dialect study. This course fulfills the Modeling Methods requirement.

Core: Modeling Methods

ENGL 25700:  HISTORY OF FILM AND CINEMA:  3 Hour(s)  

HISTORY OF FILM AND CINEMA:IM ~ This course considers the emergence of film in its dual roles as art form and popular entertainment. It reflects particularly on the establishment of film genres, including mainstream narrative movies, experimental films, and documentaries beginning in the early 20th century. It will consider important directors, producers, actors, and films that have influenced the cinema and filmmaking. We will analyze not only the aesthetic elements that make up particular films and genres but also the social and cultural contexts in which particular cinematic styles and topics emerged. We will also reflect on what the assigned films can teach us about contemporary films and popular culture. This course fulfills the Interpretive Method requirement.

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 26100:  SHAKESPEARE:IM:  3 Hour(s)  

SHAKESPEARE:IM~ This introductory course features major plays by Shakespeare with an emphasis on their place in the theater. We shall also consider historical context, language, genre, and theoretical influences on recent criticism. Plays representing early and late periods such as Twelfth Night, I Henry IV, Hamlet, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Anthony and Cleopatra, and the Winter's Tale may be included. Counts toward ENTR minor. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement. Also listed as Theatre Arts 26100.

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 28000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR~

ENGL 28100:  INDEPENDENT STUDY:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT STUDY~

ENGL 29300:  VISION OF ENGLAND I:  1 Hour(s)  

VISIONS OF ENGLAND I: MAKING THE NATION THROUGH WRITING & LANDSCAPE~ This course explores how the English landscape influenced concepts of English nationhood, literature, and society, and how these concepts, in turn, influenced the way that the English people imagined and treated their land in the nineteenth century. Wililam Morris (1834-1896) serves as the central focus of this exploration because his life became the intersection of developing trends in many fields: literature, visual arts, architecture and landscape architecture, social philosophy, and political activism. The course is largely about the ideology of the land: viewing the land, using the land, and invoking the land. Literature takes part in the creation of ideologies and can question them. Students will read about the growing nationalism connected to the land of England and the origins of the nation as seen in its land and places. Students will also read works that deal with industrialization and urbanization. Students who take this course must also register for Interdisciplinary Studies 294 or 29400, which is a study-abroad trip during the three-week semester. (Previously offered as INTD 293).

Corequisite: INTD 29400

ENGL 29500:  PREQUEL:SHAKESPEAR'S ENGLAND:  1 Hour(s)  

SHAKESPEARE'S ENGLAND~ This is a preparatory course for INTD 29500. This course will be offered and should be taken before travel to England with Shakespear's England trip abroad. This class is a twelve week, 1 hour course introdicing students to four Shakespearean plays that will sample how Shakespeare used the English language, the medium of live enactment, and available dramatic formulas, to depict his country onstage. It will consider the plays to help differentiate approaches taken by dramatic critics and theoatrical practitioners when approaching plays, and also as a beginning point for presentations, discussions, and assignments during upcoming travel to England during theStudy Abroad trip "Shakespear's England." Cross-listed with THEA 29500.

ENGL 29800:  FIELD EXPERIENCE:  1-4 Hour(s)  

FIELD EXPERIENCE~

ENGL 32800:  STUDIES IN AMERICAN LIT:IM:  3 Hour(s)  

STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE:IM~ This course offers in-depth examination of significant contemporary works of American literature. It builds on the concepts introduced in ENGL 206 or 20600 and prepares students for the advanced study and research of 400 or 40000-level courses. Students will read both primary and secondary texts and produce a short research paper. The course may be organized around a theme, concentrate on important works of a single a single author, or focus on examples of a particular literary genre. Recommended for English majors. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement. Pre-requisite: none ENGL 20600 or junior/senior standing recommended.

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 33000:  STUDIES IN BRITISH LIT:IM,CA:  3 Hour(s)  

STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATUREIM,CA~ This course offers in-depth examination of significant works of British literature. It builds on the concepts introduced in English 206 or 20600 and prepares students for the advanced study and research of 400 or 40000-level courses. Students will read both primary and secondary texts and produce a short research paper. The course may be organized around a theme, concentrate on important works of a single author, or focus on examples of a particular literary genre. Recommended for English majors Prerequisite: none. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 33100:  STUDIES IN WORLD LIT:IM,EW:  3 Hour(s)  

STUDIES IN WORLD LITERATURE:IM,EW~ This course offers in-depth enamination of significant works of world literature. It builds on the concepts introduced in English 206 or 20600 and prepares students for the advanced study and research of 400 or 40000-level courses. Students will read both primary and secondary texts and produce a short research paper. The course may be organized around a theme, concentrate on important works of a single author, or focus on examples of a particular literary genre. Recommended for English majors. Prerequisite:none. ENGL 20600 or junior/senior standing recommended. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Experiencing the World requirement.

Core: Experiencing the World; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 33200:  STUDIES IN GENRE:IM:  3 Hour(s)  

STUDIES IN GENRE:IM~ This course offers in-depth examination of significant works in a single literary genre, such as drama, poetry, the short story, the essay, or film. It introduces basic concepts of literary analysis and key terminology for the genre being covered. Students will read both primary and secondary texts and produce a short research paper. Recommended for non-majors as well as English majors. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement.

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 35000:  AMERICAN LIT I:CA,UD:  4 Hour(s)  

AMERICAN LITERATURE I:CA,UD~ This course will introduce students to literature from the American colonial, revolutionary, and Romantic periods (the 1490's through 1900), including major authors, works, and genres. In addition to specific texts, the course will consider the impact on literature of significant cultural and historical developments of the period, such as North and South American colonization and the cultural contact zone; developing American cultural identities, racial conflicts; immigration; industrialism; and westward expansion. ENGL 20600 or junior/senior standing recommended. This course fulfills the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement and the Understanding Diversity in the USA requirement. Prerequisite: none.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Understanding Diversity Home

ENGL 35100:  AMERICAN LITERATURE II:IM:  4 Hour(s)  

AMERICAN LITERATURE II:IM~ American Literature II will look at novels and poetry in various movements such as: Romanticism, Naturalism, Realism, Modernism and Postmodernism. We will also look at what modes of literary theoretical inquiry developed during these periods. By doing so, students will gain an understanding of the formation of the American Canon in the late 19th and 20th centuries. ENGL 20600 or junior/senior standing recommended. Prerequisite: none. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement.

Core: Interpretive Methods

ENGL 35300:  MEDIEVAL LITERATURE:IM,CA:  4 Hour(s)  

MEDIEVAL LITERATURE:IM,CA~ This course will explore the development of literature in the British Isles from the eighth century through the fifteenth century, including major authors, works, and genres. Cultural and historical contexts, such as the rise and decline of feudalism, pilgrimage and crusading, and the Black Death will inform the discussion and analysis. ENGL 20600 or junior/senior standing recommended. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement. Prerequisite: none.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 35400:  RENAISSANCE LITERATURE:CA,IM:  4 Hour(s)  

RENAISSANCE LITERATURE:CA,IM~ This course will explore the development of literature in the British Isles from the early sixteenth century through the mid seventeenth century, including major authors, works, and genres. Cultural and historical contexts such as the growth of printed materials, the Protestant Reformation, and the beginnings of European colonialism will inform the discussion and analysis. ENGL 20600 or junior/senior standing recommended. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement. Prerequisite: none.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 35500:  18TH CENTURY BRIT LIT:CA,IM:  4 Hour(s)  

18TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE:CA,IM~ This course will introduce students to British literature from the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including major authors, works and genres. In addition to specific texts, the course will consider significant cultural and historical developments of the period, such as the rise of the novel as a genre and the Enlightenment, and their impact on the literature. ENGL 20600 or junior/senior standing recommended. Prerequisite: none. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 35600:  19TH CENTURY BRIT LIT:CA,IM:  4 Hour(s)  

19TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE:CA,IM~ This course will introduce students to literature from the British romantic and Victorian periods (the 1790s through 1900), including major authors, works, and genres. In addition to specific texts, the course will consider significant cultural and historical developments of the period, such as industrialization, imperialism, and early feminism, and their impact on literature. ENGL 20600 or junior/senior standing recommended. Prerequisite: none. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 35700:  20TH CENTURY BRIT LIT:CA,IM:  4 Hour(s)  

20TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE:CA,IM~ This course will introduce students to literature of the British Isles and its colonies that was written in the twentieth century, including major authors, works, and genres. In addition to specific texts, the course will consider significant cultural and historical developments of the period, such as the decline of empire, World War I, and World War II, and their impact on the literature. Prerequisite: none. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 35900:  WORLD LITERATURE:EW,IM:  4 Hour(s)  

WORLD LITERATURE:EW,IM~ English language literature is found on every continent of the world. British and American colonial influence resulted in Australian, African, and Asian literatures in English, as well as Caribbean and Canadian literature in North America. Class members will read and discuss examples of these works. Non-English world literature from the Middle Ages through the modern period may also be studied. ENGL 20600 or junior/senior standing recommended. This course fulfills the Interpretive Methods requirement and the Experiencing the World requirement. Prerequisite: none.

Core: Experiencing the World; Interpretive Methods

ENGL 38000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR~

ENGL 38100:  SPC TPC::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SPECIAL TOPICS~

ENGL 41800:  ADV AMER LIT::  4 Hour(s)  

ADV STUDIES IN AMERICAN LIT: SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN LIT~ This course will engage students in advanced study and research in a topic in American literature. Recent topics include slave and capitivity narratives and the aesthetics of sublimation. Students will present a significant documented essay after a concentrated introduction to the methodology of contemporary literary study. Prequisites: English (206 or 20600) and Junior standing.

Prerequisite: (ENGL 206 or ENGL 20600)

ENGL 42800:  ADV BRIT LIT::  4 Hour(s)  

SPECIAL TOPICS IN BRITISH LITERATURE~ This course will engage students in advanced study and research in a topic in British literature. Recent topics include gender in Victorian literature and the English country house. Students will present a significant documented essay after a concentrated introduction to the methodology of contemporary literary study. Prerequisites: English (206 or 20600) and Junior standing.

Prerequisite: (ENGL 206 or ENGL 20600)

ENGL 43800:  ADV WRLD LIT::  4 Hour(s)  

SPECIAL TOPICS IN WORLD LITERATURE~ This course will engage students in advanced study and research in a topic of world literature. Recent topics include Indian literature. Students will present a significant documented essay after a concentrated introduction to the methodology of contemporary literary study. Prerequisites: ENGL (206 or 20600) and Junior Standing.

Prerequisite: (ENGL 206 or ENGL 20600)

ENGL 47000:  LITERARY THEORY:  4 Hour(s)  

LITERARY THEORY~ This introductory course in contemporary literary theory probes issues basic to language, interpretation, and culture. In response to a broad range of recent theoretical essays, we shall break ground on questions concerning the nature of the text, the (ir)relevance of historical context, the role of the reader/critic, the "death" of the author, the (in)determinacy of meaning, and the politics of gender,ethnicity, and class. Prerequisite: English (206 or 20600) and Junior standing.

Prerequisite: (ENGL 206 or ENGL 20600)

ENGL 48000:  SENIOR SEMINAR:  1-3 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR~ English majors must complete this course in their senior year. This revision and workshop course requires students to significantly rework a research paper from one of their 400 or 40000-level literature courses. The revision must include more elaborate research of primary and secondary sources, more extensive and complete exploration of a subject, and a more theoretical and sophisticated approach to the literary essay. This research project will help students to achieve achieve a historical and contemporary understanding of their subject. Students will write a one-page introduction that explains their interest in and relationship to the project. Students will identify journals or conferences that would be suitable arenas for publication and presentation. Students will present their work in a public forum. Also listed as WRIT (480 or 48000). Corequisite ENGL 48010.

Corequisite: ENGL 48010

ENGL 48010:  SENIOR SEMINAR PART I:  1 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR PART I ~ English majors must complete this course in their senior year. This revision and workshop course requires students to significantly rework a research paper from one of their 400 or 40000-level literature courses. The revision must include more elaborate research of primary and secondary sources, more extensive and complete exploration of a subject, and a more theoretical and sophisticated approach to the literary essay. This research project will help students to achieve achieve a historical and contemporary understanding of their subject. Students will write a one-page introduction that explains their interest in and relationship to the project. Students will identify journals or conferences that would be suitable arenas for publication and presentation. Students will present their work in a public forum. Also listed as WRIT 48010. Corequisite ENGL 48000.

Corequisite: ENGL 48000

ENGL 48100:  INDEPENDENT RESEARCH:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH~

ENGL 49800:  INTERNSHIP:  4 Hour(s)  

INTERNSHIP~ Developed in consultation with the student's major faculty advisor, the internship will be tailored to the interests and needs of the student, and can be served in a wide variety of private and public organizations. Hiram College's internship program permits students to bridge the distance between the theory they learn in the classroom and the application of their knowledge. The academic department establishes prerequisites for the application procedure. Students should check with individual departments for specific requirements and guidelines for the experience, as they may vary by discipline. Prospective interns work with the faculty advisor, who will monitor the experience and grade the academic component of the internship.

ENGL 53320:  CONTACT&CONFLICT:EARLY AM LIT:  3 Hour(s)  

CONTACT & CONFLICT: EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE (BEGINNINGS TO 1820) ~ American Literature, particularly before 1820, was a time of genesis--of contact (and subsequent conflict) between human beings sharing this space that we now call the United States. We will examine the historical, political, religious, and pre/post-societal implications that spurned the literature of this time period. With a 21st century lens, we will implore various forms of literary criticism of readings by authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Red Jacket, Benjamin Franklin, and Olaudah Equiano.

ENGL 58120:  CONTACT&CONFLICT: EARLY AM LIT:  3 Hour(s)  

CONTACT & CONFLICT: EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE (BEGINNINGS TO 1820) ~ American Literature, particularly before 1820, was a time of genesis--of contact (and subsequent conflict) between human beings sharing this space that we now call the United States. We will examine the historical, political, religious, and pre/post-societal implications that spurned the literature of this time period. With a 21st century lens, we will explore various forms of literary criticism of readings by authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Red Jacket, Benjamin Franklin, and Olaudah Equiano.