SOAN subject was changed to SOCI beginning fall 2020. 

SOCI 10500:  LAW & SOCIETY:  4 Hour(s)  

ISSUES IN LAW AND SOCIETY ~ This course is an introduction to the American legal system (both civil and criminal law) and its relationship with social institutions. It provides students with knowledge about the connections between justice and society with particular emphasis on the law’s historical origins and its structure and function within society. Several topics such as types of crime, juveniles and criminality, minorities and criminality, and social control are discussed allowing for better understanding of the significant interaction between law and humanity. This course is cross-listed with CRLJ 10500.

SOCI 15500:  INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY:CA:  4 Hour(s)  

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY:CA~ A basic knowledge of sociology; introduction to study of human society-related concepts, and content. Human behavior from the perspective of culture, groups, and organizations. Sociology majors must earn a “C” or higher. Prerequisite to all advanced courses except with special permission.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth

SOCI 18000:  WKSP::  1 Hour(s)  

WORKSHOP~ Workshops may be taken Pass/No Credit only. Students may take no more than nine workshops for credit toward graduation. Workshops can be used as elective credit only.

SOCI 20100:  SOCIAL PROBLEMS:ES:  4 Hour(s)  

SOCIAL PROBLEMS:ES ~ This courses uses a sociological lens to offer an in-depth look at several enduring societal problems. Examples include alcohol and drug use/abuse, mental illness, poverty, crime, family disorganization, and health care. We will also explore several causes and potential solutions of social problems. Sociology majors must earn a "C" or higher.

Prerequisite: SOAN 15500 or SOCI 15500

Core: Meaning/Ethics/Soc Responsibil

SOCI 20200:  CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:CA,EW:  4 Hour(s)  

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:CA,EW~ This course is designed to introduce students to the anthropological study of different cultures. We will explore ways of trying to understand the world views and belief systems of other peoples by studying each of those systems in their particular contexts, and then comparing and contrasting different cultures and the contexts in which they are situated. This learning process involves revealing our own cultural assumptions, and how they influence our understandings when we examine various facets of the belief systems and traditions of other societies. In attempting to understand other cultures on their own terms, we face the question of how to make sense of our own culture using the same theories and methods developed by anthropologists. In addition, we examine how our understanding of other cultures shapes the perspectives and policies western governments that seek to influence or change the life ways of people in other regions of the world.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Experiencing the World

SOCI 20300:  CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:CA,EW:  3 Hour(s)  

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:CA,EW~ This course is designed to acquaint the introductory student with pre-literate and peasant cultures and their major social and symbolic institutions. A selection of ethnographies, i.e., descriptions of cultures, will be used to illustrate the variety of human cultural systems and to introduce the student to non-Western world views. Prerequisite to all advanced courses except with special permission. A revised version of this course is offered for 4 credit hours as SOAN 20200. A student may receive credit for only one of these courses.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Experiencing the World

SOCI 21500:  HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:CA:  4 Hour(s)  

HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:URBANIZATION, SPRAWL, AND TRANSITIONS:CA~ For the vast majority of human history, people have lived in small groups. Urbanizing processes, which began millennia ago, have accelerated rapidly in recent centuries and have brought about some dramatic changes in how people live. With reference to biological evolution, we will identify fundamental human needs in order to establish a basis for assessing the degrees to which different kinds of settlements (e.g., foraging societies, early and industrial cities, and sprawl) meet those needs and for discerning the ways they influence quality of life. We give special consideration to the environmental and social consequences of settlement design and land use and explore some novel alternatives intended to aid the transition to a more sustainable model. Elective: fits within "human social systems" emphasis. Cross-listed with EVST 21500

Prerequisite: (INTD 225 or INTD 22500) or (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or EVST 10100 or SOCI 15500

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth

SOCI 22300:  SOCIAL INEQUALITY:  4 Hour(s)  

SOCIAL INEQUALITY ~ This course examines key forms of social inequality which operate in contemporary American society, especially how intersections of race/ethnicity, class, and gender shape access to societal resources and power. It explores how different dimensions of inequality relating to poverty, income, wealth, employment, education and housing are produced and experienced by differently located social actors, and concludes with a focus on the policies available to address these disparities. Sociology majors must earn a "C" or higher.

Prerequisite: SOAN 15500 or SOCI 15500

SOCI 22600:  RACE & ETHNICITY IN AMERICA:UD:  3 Hour(s)  

RACE AND ETHNICITY IN AMERICA:UD~ This course focuses on the ways in which race and ethnicity continue to shape contemporary American society, animating social relationships, identities and institutions and the distribution of material and symbolic resources. During the course we will consider the social, political and historical processes through which race and ethnicity acquire social meaning, examining changing forms of racism and discrimination, as well as expressions of racial identity. We explore how sociologists have sought to understand race and racism, and assess the significance of race and ethnicity across various domains of social life including work, housing, education, criminal justice, and health. Students will examine links between social policies and racial stratification, and consider how we might address enduring forms of racial and ethnic inequalities. At the end of the course, students will have an in-depth understanding of the origins and development of race, the structure of racial and ethnic hierarchies, sociological theories of race and racial inequality, as well as knowledge of how race and ethnicity shape the everyday realities of society.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOCI 22700:  RACE & ETHNICITY IN AMERICA:UD:  4 Hour(s)  

RACE AND ETHNICITY IN AMERICA:UD~ This course focuses on the ways in which race and ethnicity continue to shape contemporary American society, animating social relationships, identities and institutions and the distribution of material and symbolic resources. During the course we will consider the social, political and historical processes through which race and ethnicity acquire social meaning, examining changing forms of racism and discrimination, as well as expressions of racial identity. We explore how sociologists have sought to understand race and racism, and assess the significance of race and ethnicity across various domains of social life including work, housing, education, criminal justice, and health. Students will examine links between social policies and racial stratification, and consider how we might address enduring forms of racial and ethnic inequalities. At the end of the course, students will have an in-depth understanding of the origins and development of race, the structure of racial and ethnic hierarchies, sociological theories of race and racial inequality, as well as knowledge of how race and ethnicity shape the everyday realities of society. This course fulfills the Understanding Diversity in the USA requirement.

Prerequisite: SOCI 15500 or SOAN 15500

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOCI 23900:  SEX AND GENDER IN SOCIETY:UD:  3 Hour(s)  

SEX AND GENDER IN SOCIETY:UD~ This course is an introduction to the study of gender, sex, and sexuality in society using a sociological lens. Students will examine varying perspectives on sex, sexuality, and gender. Interrelationships between gender and power, social class, and health will be discussed. Additionally, topics such as the nature versus nurture debate, hegemonic masculinity, and the #feminism will be explored. TThis course is offered for three (3) credit hours as SOCI 23900.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOCI 24010:  SEX AND GENDER IN SOCIETY:UD:  4 Hour(s)  

SEX AND GENDER IN SOCIETY~ This course is an introduction to the study of gender, sex, and sexuality in society using a sociological lens. Students will examine varying perspectives on sex, sexuality, and gender. Interrelationships between gender and power, social class, and health will be discussed. Additionally, topics such as the nature versus nurture debate, hegemonic masculinity, and the #feminism will be explored. This course is offered for three (3) credit hours as SOCI 23900.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOCI 24500:  SOC MOVEMENTS/COLLECTV BEHAVR:  4 Hour(s)  

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR~ The influence of social movements and collective behavior in social change. How social institutions are maintained, modified and transformed through relatively unstructured social relations like mob and crowd reactions, fads, fashions, rumor, panic, protest groups, reform and revolution.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

SOCI 25500:  SOC OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT:  3 Hour(s)  

SOCIOLOGY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT~ This course provides students with an introduction to key concepts, principles, and debates in the field of human development from a sociological perspective. This course takes an overview of human lives, considering development and social influences on human development from birth to death. Classical theories of development are considered, and a sociological approach is emphasized: human development from its beginning cannot be understood at the individual level because it is fundamentally a socially constituted, or interactive, process. This class focuses on how human development and health throughout the course of life are shaped by many important social environments and forces, including but not limited to families, schools, neighborhoods, peer groups, work organizations, organization of health care, ideology, social policies, media, history, and culture.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

SOCI 26200:  THE FAMILY:  4 Hour(s)  

THE FAMILY ~ Using a sociological nature this course will explore interpersonal relationships and families throughout the lifespan, with an emphasis on history, diversity, inequality, society, and life course processes. We will examine several aspects of relationships and families, such as dating, mate selection, cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, childrearing, divorce, remarriage, singlehood, widowhood, parent-child interactions, sexual orientation, etc. Additionally, this course explores how these aspects can be defined and how they have evolved overtime. Such as: What constitutes a family? Is there a “proper” way to raise children? How does one’s childhood socialization affect their love life? Etc.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

SOCI 28000:  SEM::  4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR~

SOCI 28100:  INDEPENDENT STUDY:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT STUDY~

SOCI 29800:  FIELD EXPERIENCE:  1-4 Hour(s)  

FIELD EXPERIENCE~

SOCI 30300:  ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY:CA:  4 Hour(s)  

ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY:CA~ While humans are distinct in their capacity to create culture, they remain always a part of, and dependent on, nature. This course is an examination of the ongoing dialogue between human social processes and the biophysical environment within which they take place. Readings will highlight the ways in which social structures and the individual behaviors that reflect them both shape and are shaped by the environment. We will study “environmental problems” through a sociological lens, focusing on the cultural, economic, political, and other social systems and processes that give rise to them. In particular, we will examine the ways in which these systems and processes organize patterns of everyday life and consider strategies for re-organizing those patterns in the effort to respond to and mitigate socio-ecological problems. Some sections of this course may be considered service learning (SL). This course is also offered as EVST 30300

Prerequisite: (INTD 225 or INTD 22500) or (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth

SOCI 35900:  MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY:ES:  4 Hour(s)  

MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY:ES~ This course uses a sociological perspective to explore health and illness, and the practices, professions, and institutions related to health care. Focusing more on social rather than individual determinants of health and illness, it examines social forces (such as socio-economic status, gender, race/ethnicity, etc.) that are related to illness and mortality; social meanings and experiences with acute/chronic illness and disability, as well as history, structure, and status of professions within medicine and medical care. Significant topics of interest include, but are not limited to mental illness, social epidemiology, health behavior and lifestyles, the sick role, medicalization, bioethics and medical experimentation.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

Core: Meaning/Ethics/Soc Responsibil

SOCI 36200:  YOUTH AND SOCIETY:UD:  3 Hour(s)  

YOUTH AND SOCIETY:UD ~ This course examines the social-historical creation of youth as a distinctive stage of life, and offers an in-depth treatment of the sociology of youth with emphasis on social inequalities, culture and identity. This course includes a global perspective to examine differences and inequalities in the experience of youth, with specific attention to youth within advanced capitalist societies. Major social institutions will be studied regarding their linkages to and influences on youth, including but not limited to family, neighborhood/place, education, policy & law, and work/economy.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOCI 36300:  YOUTH AND SOCIETY:UD:  4 Hour(s)  

YOUTH AND SOCIETY:UD~ This course examines the creation of adolescence and youth as a distinctive stage of life in Europe, England and the USA. Youth culture at various points in history will be examined. Causes and consequences of contemporary adolescent problems will be highlighted. A revised version of this course is offered for three credit hours as SOCI 36200.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOCI 38000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR~

SOCI 38100:  SPC TPC::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY~

SOCI 38700:  FOOD:EATERS,EATING& THE ENV:CA:  4 Hour(s)  

FOOD:EXAMINING EATERS, EATING, AND THE ENVIRONMENT:CA ~ Food is a principal ingredient in sociocultural systems and conveys much about a society and its relationship with the biophysical world. This course explores the social significance of food, including: the determinants of what and how people in a society eat, the meanings associated with certain foods, how food norms reflect and perpetuate certain kind of social inequality, changes in food production and consumption processes, and the consequences of these for the health of people and the environment.

Prerequisite: (INTD 225 or INTD 22500) or (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or SOCI 15500

SOCI 45200:  SR SEM:THEORY PERSPECTIVES:  4 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES~ This course is an in-depth exploration of themes that feature prominently within classical and contemporary social theory. Students will gain a reflexive, critical, and applicable understanding of how social theorists have addressed a range of core social scientific themes such as the self/identity, power, inequality, race, gender, and the state. These themes are addressed through key thinkers from across the globe with an emphasis on the different perspectives used to make sense of such issues and how such theories can be applied to contemporary social issues. Sociology majors must earn a “C” or higher.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 15500 or SOCI 15500) and (SOAN 201 or SOAN 20100 or SOAN 323 or SOAN 32300 or SOCI 22300)

SOCI 45500:  SR SEM: METHODOLOGY:  4 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR METHODOLOGY~ This course studies the multiple types of research and analysis methods used by social scientists to develop and investigate social issues. It covers the use of qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods; exploring issues relating to topics such as research design, data, sampling, analysis, and ethics. Preparation for students’ senior capstone project will also take place in this course. Sociology majors must earn a “C” or higher.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500 or SOCI 15500) and (SOAN 201 or SOCI 20100 or SOAN 20100 or SOAN 323 or SOCI 32300 or SOAN 32300 or SOCI 22300)

SOCI 48000:  SENIOR SEMINAR - CAPSTONE:  1-4 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR - CAPSTONE ~ This course is the senior capstone for all Sociology majors. Throughout the course, students will be required to pursue independent research, design and implement their own interdisciplinary project, and present a written report and oral presentation. Frequent, focused meetings with a faculty advisor will help students explore inquiries and develop skills related to their investigation. Sociology majors must earn a “C” or higher.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 20100 or SOAN 201 or SOCI 20100 or SOAN 323 or SOCI 32300 or SOAN 32300 or SOCI 22300)

SOCI 48100:  INDEPENDENT RESEARCH:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH~

SOCI 49800:  INTERNSHIP:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INTERNSHIP~