Program Website: http://www.hiram.edu/modernlanguages

Introduction

Language study opens the way to understanding and communication with various peoples, cultures, civilizations, and literatures. It involves performance skills in the foreign language (speaking, reading, writing and understanding) and command of the subject matter (literature, history, language). The modern languages and classics program offers minors in French and Spanish as well as classes in Latin. Classical languages and Italian language may be studied at John Cabot University in Rome, and Japanese can be undertaken via our affiliation with Kansai Gaidai University in Osaka, Japan. Please consult with the Office of the Associate Dean to discuss this exchange option. A minor in classical studies can also be pursued through the multidisciplinary classical and medieval studies minor.

Students will find that their career opportunities will be broader and richer when they combine majors or minors in other disciplines with the study of a foreign language. Most other disciplines are compatible with a language major: art, biology, English, history, communication, political science, and management are just a few of the majors that benefit from a second language. Students who are interested in a teaching career would find it useful to minor in two languages.

For over 30 years the program has hosted three international students every year as modern language teaching assistants. They are Hiram students as well as instructors and representatives of the culture in question. Although these students also interact with the other international students on campus, they have always willingly provided access to their own culture for American students – in and outside of class. They are a vital part of our programs.

Eligibility for membership into Phi Beta Kappa requires completion of a language through 20200.

Language Placement

Incoming first-year students who are interested in taking a foreign language will be given a tentative placement based upon their high school language experience and a language placement examination. Students who place above 20200 should consult with a faculty member in that language before enrolling in a course.  Students should take the placement exam before First Days or orientation and advising.

Classical Studies

Classical Studies can be undertaken via our affiliation with John Cabot University in Rome. Please consult with the associate dean to discuss this exchange option.

Japanese

Currently, the Japanese major and minor programs are not offered at Hiram. Japanese can be undertaken via our affiliation with Kansai Gaidai University in Osaka, Japan. Please consult with the Office of the Associate Dean to discuss this exchange option, and the potential to build Japanese into a program of study at Hiram College.

Faculty

Elena Iglesias-Villamel, (2010) Associate Professor of Spanish
B.A., University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain;
M.A., University of Colorado;
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
iglesiasev@hiram.edu

Ella W Kirk, (1993) Professor of French; Associate Dean of Academic Affairs
B.A., Ball State University;
M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University
kirkew@hiram.edu

Matthew F Notarian, (2015) Assistant Professor of Classics; Classical & Medieval Studies Advisory Committee; Director of Study Abroad
B.A., University of Delaware;
M.A., Ph.D., University of Buffalo
notarianmf@hiram.edu

Course Descriptions

American Sign Language

ASL 12100:  AM SIGN LANG/DEAF CULTURE I:  4 Hour(s)  

INTRODUCTION TO SIGN LANGUAGE AND DEAF CULTURE I ~ This class in the introductory course for American Sign Language as a world language credit. This course will focus on the visual-spatial language of ASL with emphasis on expressive/receptive communication skill building, vocabulary development, and grammatical structure development. Deaf Culture awareness and understanding of the Deaf Community will also be featured throughout the course.

ASL 12200:  AM SIGN LANG/DEAF CULTRE II:  4 Hour(s)  

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND DEAF CULTURE II ~ This course builds on the knowledge and skills developed in ASL 12100. This course focuses on increased speed, fluency, vocabulary receptive skills and knowledge of grammatical structures. this course provides opportunities for students to continue to increase expressive communicative effectiveness using ASL with as emphasis on non-manuals. Students will further receptive skills and voice simple ASL sentences and paragraphs.

Prerequisite: ASL 12100

English Language

ENLA 18000:  WKSP::  1 Hour(s)  

WORKSHOP: ~ Workshops may be taken Pass/No Credit only. Students may take no more than nine workshops for credit toward graduation. Workshops can be used as elective credit only.

ENLA 20000:  INTERMEDIATE ENGLISH GRAMMAR:  4 Hour(s)  

INTERMEDIATE ENGLISH GRAMMAR ~ This course is designed for students whose first language is not English. It assists students as they develop and enhance knowledge of English and the American idiom through a systematic study of important grammatical concepts. Presentations of grammatical structures are supported by explanations and discussions about the rules that govern them and how they function in everyday usage. International students who must take ENLA 20000 will satisfy the Foreign Language requirement by merit of successful completion of this class. These activities are designed to provide students with the opportunity to use and internalize newly acquired language skills. Placement or permission of instructor

ENLA 28000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR: ~

ENLA 28100:  INDEPENDENT STUDY:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT STUDY ~

French

FREN 10100:  BEGINNING FRENCH I:  4 Hour(s)  

BEGINNING FRENCH I ~ This course is an introduction to basic grammar and vocabulary. It provides development of skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for the beginning student. Supplemental laboratory and practice drill sessions.

FREN 10200:  BEGINNING FRENCH II:  4 Hour(s)  

BEGINNING FRENCH II ~ A continuation of FREN 10100. Supplemental laboratory and practice drill sessions.

Prerequisite: FREN 10100 or French Placement Exam with a score of 201 or FREN 101EX

FREN 18000:  WKSP::  1 Hour(s)  

WORKSHOP: ~ Workshops may be taken Pass/No Credit only. Students may take no more than nine workshops for credit toward graduation. Workshops can be used as elective credit only.

FREN 20100:  INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I:EW:  4 Hour(s)  

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I:EW ~ Review and continuing study of grammar. Supplementary reading with conversation and composition.

Prerequisite: FREN 10200 or French Placement Exam with a score of 320 or FREN 102EX

Core: Experiencing the World

FREN 20200:  INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II:EW:  4 Hour(s)  

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II:EW ~ Study of aspects of contemporary French and francophone culture. Grammar review with discussion of current topics, vocabulary building, and situational conversation. First course that counts toward the major or minor in French.

Prerequisite: FREN 10300 or FREN 20100 or French Placement Exam with a score of 403 or FREN 201EX

Core: Experiencing the World

FREN 20300:  COMP AND CONVERS ABROAD:EW:  3 Hour(s)  

COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION ABROAD:EW ~ Offered off campus only. Daily contact with native speakers in normal situations give students the opportunity to work naturally toward greater fluency. The reading and discussion of newspapers and weekly magazines, keeping a personal journal, help students to acquire vocabulary, awareness of current issues, and familiarity with everyday language.

Prerequisite: FREN 20200

Core: Experiencing the World

FREN 20500:  FRENCH PHONETICS:EW:  3 Hour(s)  

FRENCH PHONETICS:EW ~ A study of French sounds, intonation, rules of pronunciation. Students will learn and use the international phonetic alphabet in order to correct and improve their accent, diction and pronunciation. The course will include intensive group and individual practice.

Prerequisite: FREN 20200

Core: Experiencing the World

FREN 21500:  ADVANCED READING:EW:  4 Hour(s)  

ADVANCED READING:EW ~ Readings in modern French literature. Representative works from 20th century writers from France and other francophone countries. The purpose of this course is to acquire the ability to read fluently and critically.

Prerequisite: FREN 20200

Core: Experiencing the World

FREN 22000:  ADV COMP & CONVERSATION:EW:  4 Hour(s)  

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION:EW ~ Intensive oral and written practice. Advanced grammar and systematic acquisition of vocabulary. A choice of texts on a variety of topics (history, contemporary issues, art and music) as well as literary readings will be used as a basis for discussion, oral presentations and papers.

Prerequisite: FREN 20200

Core: Experiencing the World

FREN 25000:  HIST OF FRENCH CIVILIZATION:EW:  4 Hour(s)  

HISTORY OF FRENCH CIVILIZATION:EW ~ A study of the important events in the political, cultural and artistic development of France.

Core: Experiencing the World

FREN 28000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR ~

FREN 28100:  INDEPENDENT STUDY:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT STUDY ~

FREN 29800:  FIELD EXPERIENCE:  1-4 Hour(s)  

FIELD EXPERIENCE ~

FREN 32000:  LYRIC POETRY:  3 Hour(s)  

LYRIC POETRY ~ Introduction to the rules of versification, and study of lyric poetry from the Renaissance and the 19th and 20th centuries.

FREN 33000:  17TH CENTURY LITERATURE:  4 Hour(s)  

STUDIES IN THE LITERATURE OF THE 17TH CENTURY ~ This course focuses on classicism: prose, the moralists, and theatre. Authors to be studied include Corneille, Racine, Moliere, LaFontaine, LaFayette, Pascal, LaRochefoucauld, and LaBruyere.

Prerequisite: FREN 21500

FREN 35000:  19TH CENTURY LITERATURE:  4 Hour(s)  

STUDIES IN THE LITERATURE OF THE 19TH CENTURY ~ Development from the romantic novel to realism and naturalism. Constant, Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Maupassant, Zola.

Prerequisite: FREN 21500

FREN 36000:  20th CENTURY LITERATURE:  4 Hour(s)  

STUDIES IN THE LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY ~ Study of representative authors in prose and theatre: possibilities include Proust, Gide, Mauriac, Malraux, Bernanos, Colette, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Beckett, Ionesco, Claudel, Camus, Sartre, Beauvoir, Duras.

Prerequisite: FREN 21500

FREN 38000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR ~ This course may study a chosen theme or trace the development of a particular genre, and may include literature of other francophone countries. Possible topics: Romanticism, Women in literature, the novel of Quebec, French-language literature of Africa.

FREN 38100:  SPC TPC::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SPECIAL TOPICS: ~

FREN 48000:  SENIOR SEMINAR:  1-4 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR ~

FREN 48100:  INDEPENDENT RESEARCH:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH ~

FREN 49000:  SENIOR PRESENTATION:  1 Hour(s)  

SENIOR PRESENTATION~ Each senior major will research, prepare and present a paper on an approved topic involving the literature or culture of France or another French-speaking country. Students may register for one-credit hour in the fall and one-credit hour in the spring to fulfill capstone requirement.

FREN 49800:  INTERNSHIP:  4 Hour(s)  

INTERNSHIP~ Developed in consultation with the student’s major faculty advisor(s), the internship will be tailored to the interests and needs of the student and can be served in a wide variety of private and public organizations. Hiram College’s internship program permits students to bridge the distance between the theory they learn in the classroom and the application of their knowledge. The academic department establishes prerequisites for the application procedure. Students should check with individual departments for specific requirements and guidelines for the experience as they may vary by discipline. Prospective interns work with the faculty advisor who will monitor the experience and grade the academic component of the internship.

Latin

LATN 10100:  BEGINNING LATIN I:  4 Hour(s)  

BEGINNING LATIN I ~ An introduction to the basics of the language. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring Latin vocabulary and mastering elementary grammar so that simple Latin sentences can be read.

LATN 10200:  BEGINNING LATIN II:  4 Hour(s)  

BEGINNING LATIN II ~ Continuation of LATN 10100. More complex grammar, including an introduction to the subjunctive.

Prerequisite: LATN 10100

LATN 20100:  INTERMEDIATE LATIN I: EW:  4 Hour(s)  

INTERMEDIATE LATIN I ~ Continuation of LATN 10200. Review and continuing study of new grammar, with an emphasis upon translating original Latin texts from various authors.

Prerequisite: LATN 10200

Core: Experiencing the World

LATN 20200:  INTERMEDIATE LATIN II:  4 Hour(s)  

INTERMEDIATE LATIN II: ~ Continuation of LATN 20100. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary, however, the emphasis rests upon translating and analyzing increasingly complex Latin texts from various authors. Both prose and poetry will be examined, and some attention will be given to the historical and cultural context of Latin literature.

Prerequisite: LATN 20100

LATN 28100:  INDEPENDENT STUDY:  1-4 Hour(s)  

Literature in Translation

The following courses are taught in English.

LITR 12600:  FREN LITR IN TRANSLATION:IM,EW:  3 Hour(s)  

FRENCH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION:IM,EW ~ The study of major works of French literature. Selections may also include works from francophone literature (Canada, Africa, Madagascar, the Caribbean, etc.). Course content may vary with each offering; it may treat a major theme or it may focus on major authors, or a literary movement.

Core: Experiencing the World; Interpretive Methods

LITR 16000:  JAPANESE LITERATURE:  3 Hour(s)  

JAPANESE LITERATURE ~ This course introduces students to traditional Japanese literature in translation and explores the influence of other cultures, such as Chinese and Western, in the development of the literature of Japan. Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and theatre.

LITR 18000:  WKSP::  1 Hour(s)  

WORKSHOP ~ Workshops may be taken Pass/No Credit only. Students may take no more than nine workshops for credit toward graduation. Workshops can be used as elective credit only.

LITR 28000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR ~

LITR 28100:  INDEPENDENT STUDY:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT STUDY ~

LITR 38000:  SEMINAR:  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR ~

LITR 38100:  SPC TPC::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SPECIAL TOPICS ~

Spanish

SPAN 10100:  BEGINNING SPANISH I:  4 Hour(s)  

BEGINNING SPANISH I ~ An introduction to Spanish. Development of four basic skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking. Introduction to grammar. Course taught in Spanish. Supplemental laboratory drill sessions required.

SPAN 10200:  BEGINNING SPANISH II:  4 Hour(s)  

BEGINNING SPANISH II ~ A continuation of SPAN 10100. Supplemental laboratory drill sessions required.

Prerequisite: SPAN 10100 (may be taken concurrently) or Spanish Placement Exam with a score of 270 or SPAN 101EX

SPAN 18000:  WKSP::  1 Hour(s)  

WORKSHOP: ~ Workshops may be taken Pass/No Credit only. Students may take no more than nine workshops for credit toward graduation. Workshops can be used as elective credit only.

SPAN 20100:  INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I:EW:  4 Hour(s)  

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I:EW ~ A continuation of SPAN 10200. First course counted toward a Spanish minor. Quick grammar review. Conversation and composition labs. SPAN 20100 or any course numbered higher than 20100 may be used to satisfy a humanities distributive requirement.

Prerequisite: SPAN 10200 or Spanish Placement Exam with a score of 346 or SPAN 102EX

Core: Experiencing the World

SPAN 20200:  INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II:EW:  3 Hour(s)  

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II:EW ~ A continuation of SPAN 20100. Continuing study of grammatical and idiomatic difficulties. Emphasis on vocabulary building through reading and discussion.

Prerequisite: SPAN 10300 or SPAN 20100 or Spanish Placement Exam with a score of 428 or SPAN 201EX

Core: Experiencing the World

SPAN 20300:  CONVERSATN/COMP ABROAD:EW:  4 Hour(s)  

CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION ON SITE ABROAD:EW ~ Offered only abroad in the twelve-week term, this course is a systematic approach to learning the contemporary language of the host company. Daily contact with native speakers, newspaper and magazine readings, daily journal entries, and compositions afford the student practice in communicating.

Prerequisite: SPAN 20000 or SPAN 20010

Core: Experiencing the World

SPAN 20400:  CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION:  4 Hour(s)  

CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION ~ An intensive course in oral and written practice designed to develop conversational and written skills by fostering a systematic acquisition of vocabulary and study of more complex grammatical structures. Our overall purposes are learning conversational techniques and strategies, improve student’s listening and pronunciation and strengthen students’ grasp of Spanish vocabulary and grammar with emphasis on building fluency in spoken and written work.

Prerequisite: SPAN 20200

SPAN 21100:  PHONETICS:  4 Hour(s)  

PHONETICS ~ Theory of Spanish phonetics, symbols, transcription, interpretation. Intensive pronunciation practice and student-taped exercises. A performance component will be included. This course is vital for prospective teachers of Spanish and of interest to all students desiring to correct their pronunciation.

Prerequisite: SPAN 10400 or SPAN 20200

SPAN 21500:  ADV READ/INTRO/CRITCSM:IM,EW:  4 Hour(s)  

ADVANCED READING AND INTRODUCTION TO CRITICISM:IM,EW ~ An introduction to extensive reading in contemporary Spanish: vocabulary building, idiomatic usage, development of rapid comprehension, and critical analysis. A revised offering of this course is available as SPAN 20010 for four (4) credit hours.

Prerequisite: SPAN 20200 or SPAN 20400

Core: Experiencing the World; Interpretive Methods

SPAN 22800:  SPANISH FOR BUSINESS:  1 Hour(s)  

SPANISH FOR BUSINESS ~ Course Description: Spanish for Business is a 1-credit course designed for intermediate-level and advanced students of Spanish seeking to develop their Spanish language skills in a cross-cultural business context. Through a variety of activities and projects that reflect real-life scenarios, students will learn to interact with an increasing number of Spanish-speaking co-workers and clients.

Prerequisite: SPAN 20100

SPAN 22900:  SPAN HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS:  1 Hour(s)  

SPANISH FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS ~ Course Description: Spanish for Healthcare Professionals is a course designed for students planning to work in the health care field and who are interested acquiring skills to communicate effectively when providing medical care. In addition to learning workplace Spanish language and improving your language skills, we will focus on developing a cultural competency for health care situations.

Prerequisite: SPAN 20100

SPAN 23000:  SPANISH TRANSLATION:  1 Hour(s)  

SPANISH TRANSLATION ~ Course Description: This course focuses on the method and practice of translation. Students will analyze and practice specific translation strategies as they pertain to distinct text types. This one-credit hour course will be taught in a workshop format, in which students will workshop drafts of translations with their peers and analyze strategic decisions and decisions of detail. Students will be evaluated on the translations they produce as well as their ability to analyze and critique their own and existing translations.

Prerequisite: SPAN 20100

SPAN 23100:  ADVANCED GRAMMAR/COMPOSITION:  4 Hour(s)  

ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION ~ The study of advanced grammar and syntax in Spanish for non-native speakers to increase their grammatical accuracy and develop linguistic sophistication. Prerequisite or permission.

Prerequisite: SPAN 21500 or SPAN 20010

SPAN 24000:  SPAN/LATIN AMERICAN FILM:CA,EW:  4 Hour(s)  

Spanish and Latin American Film:CA,EW ~ Spanish and Latin American Cinema is an introduction to the Spanish and Latin American cinema through the discussion and critical analysis of a selection of movies directed by internationally praised film makers. It has two main focuses: first, introduce students to the formal conventions of film analysis; second, all classroom interactions are conducted entirely in the target language, so students can further develop their proficiency in Spanish. The contents of the course are organized thematically around topics such as memory, immigration, exile, marginalized identities and globalization. The films and activities in this class will enable students to improve their language and critical skills in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 20200

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Experiencing the World

SPAN 25000:  PENINSULAR SPANISH CIV:CA,EW:  4 Hour(s)  

PENINSULAR SPANISH CIVILIZATION:CA,EW ~ Introduction to the issues which shape the national cultures and the cultural practices of the Spanish world, from prehistoric times to the present. Emphasis on diversity, emergence of new imagined communities, cultural hybridity, and social movements within a historical framework.

Prerequisite: SPAN 20200 (may be taken concurrently)

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Experiencing the World

SPAN 25100:  SPAN AMRCN CIVILIZATION:CA,EW:  4 Hour(s)  

SPANISH AMERICAN CIVILIZATION:CA,EW ~ Introduction to the issues which shape the national cultures and the cultural practices of the Latin American world, from pre-Colombian times to the present. Emphasis on diversity, emergence of new imagined communities, cultural hybridity, and social movements within a historical framework.

Prerequisite: SPAN 20200

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Experiencing the World

SPAN 28000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR ~

SPAN 28100:  INDEPENDENT STUDY:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT STUDY ~

SPAN 29800:  FIELD EXPERIENCE:  4 Hour(s)  

FIELD EXPERIENCE ~

SPAN 30300:  GOLDEN AGE THEATER:  4 Hour(s)  

GOLDEN AGE THEATRE~

Prerequisite: SPAN 20000

SPAN 30400:  GOLDEN AGE POETRY:  4 Hour(s)  

GOLDEN-AGE POETRY~ This course presents a study of Golden-Age poetry, and will focus on the romances, including poetry by Góngora, Quevedo, Garcilaso, Herrera, Cervantes, Lope de Vega and the mystics: Sta. Teresa de Jesus and San Juan de la Cruz. Prerequisite or permission.

Prerequisite: SPAN 21500 or SPAN 20010

SPAN 30500:  GOLDEN AGE PROSE:  4 Hour(s)  

GOLDEN AGE PROSE~ Cervantes (but not the Quixote), Quevedo, Discovery.

Prerequisite: SPAN 21500 or SPAN 20010

SPAN 30600:  19TH C. PENINSULAR LITR:  4 Hour(s)  

19TH CENTURY PENINSULAR LITERATURE ~ From Romanticism through Costumbrism and Realism to the Generation of '98.

Prerequisite: SPAN 21500 or SPAN 20010

SPAN 30700:  20TH C. PENINSULAR SPAN DRAMA:  4 Hour(s)  

20TH CENTURY PENINSULAR SPANISH DRAMA ~ From Lorca to Diosdado, including Casona, Buero, Sastre and Delibes.

Prerequisite: SPAN 21500 or SPAN 20010

SPAN 30800:  20TH C. PENINSUL SPAN FICTION:  4 Hour(s)  

20TH CENTURY PENINSULAR SPANISH FICTION ~ Tremendismo, its precursors and its aftermath. Cela, Laforet, Matute, Aldecoa, Quiroga, Medio, Goytisolo, Castillo Puche and others.

Prerequisite: SPAN 21500 or SPAN 20010

SPAN 30900:  20TH C. PENINSUL SPAN POETRY:  4 Hour(s)  

20TH CENTURY PENINSULAR SPANISH POETRY ~ The precursors of Alberti.

Prerequisite: SPAN 21500 or SPAN 20010

SPAN 38000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR ~ This course provides an in-depth study of one author or one theme or literary movement or genre. Prerequisite: SPAN 30000-level coursework and permission.

SPAN 38100:  SPC TPC::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SPECIAL TOPICS ~

SPAN 48000:  SENIOR SEMINAR:  1-4 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR ~

SPAN 48100:  INDEPENDENT RESEARCH:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH ~

SPAN 49000:  SENIOR PRESENTATION:  1-4 Hour(s)  

SENIOR PRESENTATION ~ The Spanish senior seminar is an independently driven capstone experience required of all Spanish majors. During their senior year students will complete a directed project consisting of two components: 1.) an in-depth research paper and 2.) a personal portfolio as a means of self-assessment. This work will culminate in a formal, public presentation at the end of the academic year. The overall goals of the senior project are to work independently, to reflect on progress toward personal and professional goals, and to demonstrate mature communication skills.

SPAN 49800:  INTERNSHIP:  4 Hour(s)  

INTERNSHIP ~ Developed in consultation with the student’s major faculty advisor(s), the internship will be tailored to the interests and needs of the student and can be served in a wide variety of private and public organizations. Hiram College's internship program permits students to bridge the distance between the theory they learn in the classroom and the application of their knowledge. The academic department establishes prerequisites for the application procedure. Students should check with individual departments for specific requirements and guidelines for the experience as they may vary by discipline. Prospective interns work with the faculty advisor who will monitor the experience and grade the academic component of the internship.

Academic Offerings