SOAN 10500:  LAW & SOCIETY:  4 Hour(s)  

ISSUES IN LAW AND SOCIETY ~ This course is an introduction to the American legal system (both civil and criminal law) and its relationship with social institutions. It provides students with knowledge about the connections between justice and society with particular emphasis on the law’s historical origins and its structure and function within society. Several topics such as types of crime, juveniles and criminality, minorities and criminality, and social control are discussed allowing for better understanding of the significant interaction between law and humanity.

SOAN 15500:  INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY:CA:  4 Hour(s)  

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY:CA~ A basic knowledge of sociology;introduction to study of human society-related concepts, and content. Human behavior from the perspective of culture, groups, and organizations. Prerequisite to all advanced courses except with special permission. Sociology majors/minors must earn a “C” or higher. This course fulfills the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth

SOAN 18000:  WKSP::  1 Hour(s)  

WORKSHOP~ Workshops may be taken Pass/No Credit only. Students may take no more than nine workshops for credit toward graduation. Workshops can be used as elective credit only.

SOAN 20100:  SOCIAL PROBLEMS:ES:  4 Hour(s)  

SOCIAL PROBLEMS:ES ~ This course identifies and describes the main features of enduring societal problems, including, for example, alcohol and drug use, mental illness, poverty, crime, family disorganization, and health care. Causes are considered and solutions are proposed.

Core: Meaning/Ethics/Soc Responsibil

SOAN 20200:  CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:CA,EW:  4 Hour(s)  

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:CA,EW~ This course is designed to introduce students to the anthropological study of different cultures. We will explore ways of trying to understand the world views and belief systems of other peoples by studying each of those systems in their particular contexts, and then comparing and contrasting different cultures and the contexts in which they are situated. This learning process involves revealing our own cultural assumptions, and how they influence our understandings when we examine various facets of the belief systems and traditions of other societies. In attempting to understand other cultures on their own terms, we face the question of how to make sense of our own culture using the same theories and methods developed by anthropologists. In addition, we examine how our understanding of other cultures shapes the perspectives and policies western governments that seek to influence or change the life ways of people in other regions of the world. This course fulfills the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement and the Experiencing the World requirement.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Experiencing the World

SOAN 20300:  CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:CA,EW:  3 Hour(s)  

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY:CA,EW~ This course is designed to acquaint the introductory student with pre-literate and peasant cultures and their major social and symbolic institutions. A selection of ethnographies, i.e., descriptions of cultures, will be used to illustrate the variety of human cultural systems and to introduce the student to non-Western world views. This course fulfills the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement and the Experiencing the World requirement. Prerequisite to all advanced courses except with special permission. A revised version of this course is offered for 4 credit hours as SOAN 20200. A student may receive credit for only one of these courses.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth; Experiencing the World

SOAN 20500:  SOUTH AFRICA:PREQUEL:  1 Hour(s)  

SOUTH AFRICA:PREQUEL ~ This 1 credit hour course is a prerequisite for INTD 30140 CHANGING LANDSCAPES:INTEGRATING SOCIOLOGICAL AND ECOLOGICAL LANDSCAPES IN AN EXPLORATION OF CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN SOUTH AFRICA.

SOAN 21500:  HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:CA:  4 Hour(s)  

HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:URBANIZATION, SPRAWL, AND TRANSITIONS:CA~ For the vast majority of human history, people have lived in small groups. Urbanizing processes, which began millennia ago, have accelerated rapidly in recent centuries and have brought about some dramatic changes in how people live. With reference to biological evolution, we will identify fundamental human needs in order to establish a basis for assessing the degrees to which different kinds of settlements (e.g., foraging societies, early and industrial cities, and sprawl) meet those needs and for discerning the ways they influence quality of life. We give special consideration to the environmental and social consequences of settlement design and land use and explore some novel alternatives intended to aid the transition to a more sustainable model. Elective: fits within "human social systems" emphasis. Prerequisites: INTD (225 or 22500) or SOAN (155 or 15500) Cross-listed with EVST This course fulfills the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement.

Prerequisite: (INTD 225 or INTD 22500) or (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth

SOAN 22600:  ETHNICITY IN AMERICA:UD:  3 Hour(s)  

ETHNICITY IN AMERICA:UD~ This course will take a close look at the culturally diverse groups of people in the United States. It will inquire into their origins, their contributions, and their incorporation into American society. Among the topics that will be discussed are the merits of the melting pot theory and the concept of cultural pluralism. This course will deal in depth with the experience of Euro-Americans, African-Americans, and Latino-Americans. A revised version of this course is offered for 4 hours as SOAN 22700. Prerequisite: Sociology 155 or 15500 . This course fulfills the Understanding Diversity in the USA requirement.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOAN 24010:  SEX AND GENDER IN SOCIETY:UD:  4 Hour(s)  

SEX AND GENDER IN SOCIETY~ This course is an introduction to the study of gender roles. By examining what it means to be male and female, we will see how different and how similar the sexes are in terms of their abilities, advantages, and the work they do. Moreover, we will look at the methods and theories social scientists use to study and explain these differences. This course fulfills the Understanding Diversity in the USA requirement. This course is offered for three (3) credit hours as Sociology 23900.

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOAN 25100:  INTRO TO SOCIAL DEMOGRAPHY:  4 Hour(s)  

POPULATION PATTERNS AN INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL DEMOGRAPHY~ This course is about population, the causes of population growth and change, and the consequences of population trends for human society. These issues will be analyzed from the point of view of the three components of population growth (fertility, morality, and migration), and the factors, especially social factors, which affect them. Finally, the course will investigate the ways in which societies and cultures respond to population change, with an emphasis on the sociodemographic future of the United States. Also listed as Management 25100. Prerequisite: Sociology (155 or 15500).

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 25500:  SOC OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT:  3 Hour(s)  

SOCIOLOGY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT~ This course provides students with an introduction to key concepts, principles, and debates in the field of human development from a sociological perspective. This course takes an overview of human lives, considering development and social influences on human development from birth to death. Classical theories of development are considered, and a sociological approach is emphasized: human development from its beginning cannot be understood at the individual level because it is fundamentally a socially constituted, or interactive, process. This class focuses on how human development and health throughout the course of life are shaped by many important social environments and forces, including but not limited to families, schools, neighborhoods, peer groups, work organizations, organization of health care, ideology, social policies, media, history, and culture. Prerequisite: SOAN 155 or 15500

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 26200:  THE FAMILY:  4 Hour(s)  

THE FAMILY ~ Using a sociological nature this course will explore interpersonal relationships and families throughout the lifespan, with an emphasis on history, diversity, inequality, society, and life course processes. We will examine several aspects of relationships and families, such as dating, mate selection, cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, childrearing, divorce, remarriage, singlehood, widowhood, parent-child interactions, sexual orientation, etc. Additionally, this course explores how these aspects can be defined and how they have evolved overtime. Such as: What constitutes a family? Is there a “proper” way to raise children? How does one’s childhood socialization affect their love life? Etc.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 26500:  SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION:  3 Hour(s)  

SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION~ Religious beliefs, practices, and organizations all affect, and are affected by, the social order. The course focuses on the social functions of religion, the nature of the variety of organizational forms of religion, and trends of impact of each on the other; e.g., secularization, religious movements, and civil religion. A revised version of this course is offered for 4 hours as SOAN 26600. Prerequisite Sociology (155 or 15500)

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 26710:  SOCIOLOGY OF BLACK FAMILIES:UD:  3 Hour(s)  

SOCIOLOGY OF BLACK FAMILIES:UD~ This introductory course will examine the history, experiences, struggles and progress of Black families in the U.S. We will explore cultural processes as well as political, economic, and social structures and policies that have shaped, and continue to shape, the ways in which Black families have formed and functioned. Beginning with slavery and ending with current issues facing Black families, the course is organized chronologically, with an emphasis on the ways in which African American families have acted as agents in their own lives by developing adaptive strategies (e.g. political resistance, reliance on extended kinship networks, responding to sociological shifts, etc...) to ensure their survival. Through course lectures, required readings, discussions, and documentaries, we will explore the impact of various social policies on the survival of Black families over time; e.g., Jim Crow, desegregation, welfare reform, etc. Finally, we will investigate key concepts, theories, and factors contributing to our understanding of Black families in the U.S. This course fulfills the Understanding Diversity in the USA requirement. This course is also offered for four (4) credit hours as Sociology 26700.

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOAN 27500:  INTRO TO ARCHAEOLOGY:CA:  4 Hour(s)  

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY:CA~ From prehistoric hunter-gatherers to early civilizations to the Industrial Revolution, archaeology (a subfield of anthropology) is concerned with the study of the past through material remains. The objective of this course is to introduce the methods and theories that archaeologists use to understand past societies. It will also include a thematic discussion of some of the major events of the human past, such as the origins of tool use, the worldwide spread of the species, and the origins of agriculture and urban life. This course fulfills the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement.

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth

SOAN 28000:  SEM::  4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR~

SOAN 28100:  INDEPENDENT STUDY:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT STUDY~

SOAN 29800:  FIELD EXPERIENCE:  1-4 Hour(s)  

FIELD EXPERIENCE~

SOAN 30300:  ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY:CA:  4 Hour(s)  

ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY:CA~ While humans are distinct in their capacity to create culture, they remain always a part of, and dependent on, nature. This course is an examination of the ongoing dialogue between human social processes and the biophysical environment within which they take place. Readings will highlight the ways in which social structures and the individual behaviors that reflect them both shape and are shaped by the environment. We will study “environmental problems” through a sociological lens, focusing on the cultural, economic, political, and other social systems and processes that give rise to them. In particular, we will examine the ways in which these systems and processes organize patterns of everyday life and consider strategies for re-organizing those patterns in the effort to respond to and mitigate socio-ecological problems. Some sections of this course may be considered service learning (SL). This course fulfills the Social and Cultural Analysis requirement. This course is also offered as Environmental Studies 30300 Prerequisite: INTD (225 or 22500) or SOAN (155 or 15500)

Prerequisite: (INTD 225 or INTD 22500) or (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

Core: Social/Cultural Analysis Meth

SOAN 30600:  WORK AND FAMILY:  3 Hour(s)  

WORK AND FAMILY~ This course examines selected topics and research in the growing area of work-family studies from a sociological perspective. During the semester we will explore how work and family life interconnect and influence each other and the implications of these linkages for women, men, children, employers, the community and society. Of particular interest will be how gender, social class, family structure and race and ethnicity affect the ability to manage work and family. Topics will include changing attitudes towards work-life balance; working families and the time squeeze; gender and the household division of labor; dual-career and single parent families; low-income families; work and the care-giving conflict; mothers, work, and family; fathers, work and family; strategies for resolving work-family conflict; international perspectives on work and family; and corporate and government responses to work-family conflict and their effects. We will consider a number of core questions, including: how has the relationship between work and family changed over time; how do jobs and workplaces affect family life; how do family commitments influence the behaviors of workers and their ability to contribute to the economy; and to what extent do existing policies meet the needs of working families?

SOAN 31500:  THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT:  3 Hour(s)  

THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT~ This course is a sociological overview of the Civil Rights Movement from a social movements perspective. Students will become familiar with the struggle of African-Americans and the events that led up to, sustained and resulted from the Civil Rights Movement. They will also become familiar with the factors that contribute to the development of a social movement in general. Students will also critically analyze the impact of the Civil Rights Movement on current civil rights issues. An abbreviated version of Sociology 31510 for three semester hours. Prerequisite: SOAN (155 or 15500)

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 32000:  SOC DEVIANCE&THEORY PERSPECT:  4 Hour(s)  

SOCIAL DEVIANCE, THEORETICAL PERSPECITVES~ Various theoretical approaches to understanding deviant (thus problem-creating) behavior within our society and the methods used to know them. Also, the organized efforts at resolution of these problems. A revised version of this course is offered for three credit hours as Sociology 32100. A student may receive credit for only one of these courses. Prerequisite: Sociology (155 or 15500).

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 32300:  SOCIAL INEQUALITY:  4 Hour(s)  

SOCIAL INEQUALITY~ A consideration of social differences arising out of distinctions along the lines of class, status, prestige, and power. The focus of the study in the United States, but other societies are also considered. Occupational, ideological, and mobility differentiation. A revised version of this course is offered for three credit hours as Sociology 32200. A student may receive credit for only one of these courses. This is a service learning course. An additional field trip fee is required. Prerequisites: Sociology (155 or 15500).

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 35100:  STRATIFICATION AND HEALTH:  4 Hour(s)  

STRATIFICATION AND HEALTH~ This course is an introduction to social epidemiology (the social distribution of health and illness). We will focus on examining how physical and mental health varies by socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity and gender. We will also look at the causal explanations for these relationships. We will also spend some time improving our understanding of how access to resources such as health care, social support and psychosocial resources (mastery, for example) shape health outcomes, as well as consider the role of social context in health outcomes—households, neighborhoods, communities, etc.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 35410:  SOC OF AGE, AGING & LIFE:  4 Hour(s)  

SOCIOLOGY OF AGE, AGING AND THE LIFE COURSE~ This course provides an introduction to the sociological study of age as a feature of social structure that is highly influential of individuals, groups and belief systems. Theoretical concepts will be emphasized, as will empirical approaches to the sociological study of age. Topics include but are not limited to the social history of age, the life course and transitions within it, sociological theories of age, and demography of aging. Specific aspects of social structure that will be studied in this course include old age and the welfare state; family relationships and social support; work and retirement; health and health care; death, dying and bereavement; poverty, social inequality, and the economics of aging; and politics. Throughout this course, specific attention will be given to how the sociological perspective differs from biological and psychological perspectives on age and aging. A revised version of this course is offered for three credit hours as SOAN 35400. Prerequisite: SOAN (155 or 15500)

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 35600:  SOC MENTAL HEALTH & ILLNESS:  3 Hour(s)  

SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH AND ILLNESS~ This course is an introduction to the sociological perspective of mental health and illness. Sociologists have made important contributions to our understanding of mental health and illness is three important ways: the history and organization of treatment for mental illness; definitions, recognition and perceptions of mental illness (including stigma associated with labeling); and the prevalence and distribution of mental health/illness. We will also discuss the experience of mental illness from the perspective of persons living with mental illness and their families. A revised version of this course is offered for four credit hours as SOAN 35610. Prerequsite: SOAN (155 or 15500)

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 35800:  SOC INSTITUTIONAL LONG-TERM:  3 Hour(s)  

SOCIOLOGY OF INSTITUTIONALIZED LONG-TERM CARE~ This course includes an overview of literature, empirical methods, and theories as they relate to the sociological study of long-term care organizations and the experiences of those who work, live and have loved ones within them. Explicit attention will be focused on how social policies influence both social structures and human experiences of long-term care. Current debates about quality of life and quality of care, as well as current social movements to transform the culture and structure of long-term care, will be studied, discussed and debated. Medical/clinical orientations to long-term care will be compared and contrasted to sociological perspectives and scholarship in this substantive area. Some sections of this course may be considered service learning (SL). An abbreviated version of Sociology 35810 for four semester hours. Prerequisite: SOAN (155 or 15500)

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 35900:  MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY:ES:  4 Hour(s)  

MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY:ES~ This course introduces a sociological perspective on health and illness, and on practices, professions and institutions related to health care. In this course, we will develop a critical analytic lens using the “sociological imagination” to understand social rather than individual determinants of health and illness, and to understand issues and debates related to health care in the United States and in global perspective. We will examine social forces (including but not limited to poverty, other socio-economic statuses, gender, race/ethnicity) that are related to illness and mortality patterns in the United States and around the globe; social meanings and experiences associated with acute illness, chronic illness, disability and mental illness; the history, structure and status of professions within medicine including physicians, nurses, pharmacy, and alternative care providers; structures, costs, health outcomes and problems associated with several countries’ health care delivery systems; and issues of bioethics. Significant topics of interest in this course may include but are not limited to social epidemiology; health behavior and lifestyles; the sick role; social influences on the experiences of being ill and seeking care; medical professions; medicalization; health care institutions and policies; and bioethical implications of medical experimentation in the Nazi era and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Critical thinking and attention to diversity, within the United States and globally, are emphasized in this course. This class requires out of class health care related participation. Prerequisite: SOAN (155 or 15500) This course fulfills the Meaning, Ethics, and Social Responsibility requirement.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

Core: Meaning/Ethics/Soc Responsibil

SOAN 36200:  YOUTH AND SOCIETY:UD:  3 Hour(s)  

YOUTH AND SOCIETY:UD ~ This course examines the creation of adolescence and youth as a distinctive stage of life in Europe, England and the USA. Youth culture at various points in history will be examined. Causes and consequences of contemporary adolescent problems will be highlighted. A revised version of this course is offered for four credit hours as SOAN 36300. Prerequisite Sociology (155 or 15500).

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

Core: Understanding Diversity Home

SOAN 38000:  SEM::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SEMINAR~

SOAN 38100:  SPC TPC::  1-4 Hour(s)  

SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY~

SOAN 38700:  FOOD:EATERS,EATING& THE ENV:CA:  4 Hour(s)  

FOOD:EXAMINING EATERS, EATING, AND THE ENVIRONMENT:CA ~ Food is a principal ingredient in sociocultural systems and conveys much about a society and its relationship with the biophysical world. This course explores the social significance of food, including: the determinants of what and how people in a society eat, the meanings associated with certain foods, how food norms reflect and perpetuate certain kind of social inequality, changes in food production and consumption processes, and the consequences of these for the health of people and the environment. Prerequisite: SOAN 15500 or INTD 22500

Prerequisite: (INTD 225 or INTD 22500) or (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500)

SOAN 45200:  SR SEM:THEORY PERSPECTIVES:  4 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES~ Study of selected early masters of sociological thought and contemporary theorists. Emphasis on underlying assumptions and substantive content. Prerequisite: Sociology (155 or 15500) or (202 or 20200) or permission. Sociology majors must earn a “C” or higher.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or (SOAN 202 or SOAN 20200)

SOAN 45500:  SR SEM: METHODOLOGY:  4 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR METHODOLOGY~ A brief review of the basic research methods used by social scientists. This is followed by an intensive investigation of the particular research design of survey research. Finally, there will be a utilization of this approach in a secondary analysis of available data. Students are encouraged to have a basic statistics course before enrolling. Prerequisite: Sociology (155 or 15500) or (202 or 20200) or permission. Sociology majors must earn a “C” or higher.

Prerequisite: (SOAN 155 or SOAN 15500) or (SOAN 202 or SOAN 20200)

SOAN 48000:  SENIOR SEMINAR:  1-4 Hour(s)  

SENIOR SEMINAR~

SOAN 48100:  INDEPENDENT RESEARCH:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH~

SOAN 49800:  INTERNSHIP:  1-4 Hour(s)  

INTERNSHIP~